How to Talk About Money Problems

Why is money such a sensitive topic?

I think everyone out there has experienced a time or two in their lives when somebody has gotten offended in a conversation dealing with money. They say the three things you should not talk about in a bar are: money, politics, or religion. Money can be a personal thing for each person, and should be treated that way if they feel offended.

Most of the time when a person avoids the conversation of “money” is because they feel ashamed of talking about their failures. Society now days praise the successful individual, but doesn’t show empathy for the one who fails. You can get a better picture in this time, mainly because America has just survived a recession period that started back in 2008, which took the homes and savings of millions of individuals.

Nobody likes to be seen as a failure. Nobody likes to share that they made the wrong decision in buying a house that was eventually going to devalue drastically, nobody likes to share about the time they spent all their money in a business that lead to bankruptcy, but we should act as my buddy KrantCents says, “ Successful people have made mistakes and lost money too. They may have lost their home, job and savings too.  They just lick their wounds, regroup and start over again.” In his post I am Broke.

Another reason that makes money a sensitive topic is that sometimes people like to brag to much about money, and sometimes this same individuals like to tell people what to do, or where to invest. Remember that nobody likes to be told what to do. Instead of teaching a person on how to get out of debt or reach their financial goals, you can make them resent you to the point of doing completely the opposite of what you propose.

I believe talking about money should be more open. Millionaires out there only talk about money and investments. Connecting with like-minded individuals, who talk about their failures and success can help you reach financial success, by learning from people’s failures and success.

Here are some rules to use next time you talk about money to create a meaningful and rich conversation.

1.Make sure to humble yourself.

Share those times that you have failed, tell them that you have made mistakes along the road and how did you get out of them. Nobody likes someone who brags about his or her success all the time. By humbling yourself you can create TRUST and then conversation will flow easier.

2.Don’t offer advice you haven’t actually tried

Don’t offer any advice that you haven’t actually done yourself, don’t try to sound smart in the conversation by telling people what they want to hear. You may actually mislead them to take financial decisions that will only make their situation worst or can make them lose some money.

 3.Feel free to agree to disagree, Respectfully…

When somebody is sharing a financial advice that doesn’t play by your rules, feel free to agree to disagree with their point of view. This will only stimulate conversation and may actually lead to a throughout understanding of the topic debated. People don’t always like to hear they are right, especially when it comes to money, many times people are not even sure if they are doing the right thing. Has it ever happened to you that by the end of the conversation the other person ends up saying “You know what you are right, why didn’t I think about that?”

 

Share the experiences you have been through while talking about money in a comment below.

 

 


Francisco

Frank is the Founder of Wall Street College and a dedicated stock investor. Having an enormous passion for Investing, Stocks, and Success, Frank decided to start WallStCollege.com with the purpose of educating people on how to put their money to work, teach them how to invest in stocks, and how to always strive for Financial Freedom.

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